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Frozen vs Subway Surfers






When Elsa start to sleep in her dream enter in Subway Surfers, She have to catch Jake!
But with her power, it's to easy! Enjoy the video 😁😁

The Story Behind Frozen!

Frozen (2013 film) poster.jpg
Frozen Film (2013)

Frozen is a 2013 American 3D computer-animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures.[5] The 53rd Disney animated feature film, it is inspired by Hans Christian Andersen's 1844 fairy tale "The Snow Queen".[6] It tells the story of a fearless princess who sets off on a journey alongside a rugged iceman, his loyal reindeer, and a naive snowman to find her estranged sister, whose icy powers have inadvertently trapped their kingdom in eternal winter. Frozen underwent several story treatments before being commissioned in 2011, with a screenplay written by Jennifer Lee, who also co-directed with Chris Buck. The film features the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad, and Santino Fontana. Christophe Beck was hired to compose the film's orchestral score, while Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez wrote the songs. Frozen premiered at the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, California, on November 19, 2013,[7] had a limited release on November 22 and went into general theatrical release on November 27.

      The  Character behind film


Subway Surfers vs Hulk






This video is a parody of Subway Surfers, if Hulk enter in this world, what will happend?!
Two of most famous character the green big guy vs the little jake!


The Story Behind Subway Surfers


 
Subway Surfers app logo.png



Subway Surfers is an open runner mobile game created by Kiloo and SYBO Games, 
 It is available on ios and Android Phone platforms and uses the Unity game engine.In the game, players take the role of young graffiti artists who, upon being caught in the act of applying graffiti to ("tagging") a metro railway site, run through the railroad tracks to escape from the inspector and his dog. As they run, they grab gold coins, power-ups and other items along the way while simultaneously dodging collisions with trains and other objects, and can also jump on top of the trains and surf with hoverboards to evade the capture until the character crashes on an obstacle, getting caught by the inspector or getting hit by a train. Special events, such as the Weekly Hunt, can result in in-game rewards and characters. Subway Surfers was released on 24 May 2012[ with updates based on seasonal holidays. Since January 2013, updates have been based on a "World Tour" theme, which updates the setting of the game every three (or four, usually for seasonal holidays) weeks. In 2017, Subway Surfers was the most downloaded game across the globe.[5] In March 2018, Subway Surfers became the first game on the Google Play Store to cross the one billion downloads threshold.[6] In May 2018, Subway Surfers crossed the two billion download mark.[7] App Annie reported Subway Surfers as the  downloaded game of all time in iOS App Store.[8] In December 2019, SYBO Games announced that Subway Surfers, according with AppAnnie statistics, crossed the 2.7 billion download mark. Subway Surfers was the most downloaded mobile game of the decade from 2012 to 2019.In addition to the mobile game, SYBO Games introduced the Subway Surfers animated series. cit wikipedia
The Character Behind the games!!

Number

PictureNameCostLimited
1Jake1JakeDefault Jake Spray CanNo
2Tricky1TrickyTricky Hat 3
(Tricky's Hat)
No
3Fresh1FreshFresh Boombox 50
(Fresh's Stereo)
No
4Spike1SpikeSpike Guitar 200
(Spike's Guitars)
No
5Yutani1YutaniYutani UFO 500
(Yutani's UFOs)


Dame Tu Cosita vs Super Mario




In this video the green alien enter in super mario world, and battle with goomba mushroom and much more! Enjoy the video and write a comment!

Who is Dame tu Cosita? 

                                                                                                           In a reddish, rocky habitat, a green alien called dame tu cosita is shown with its arms stretched out, dancing. An outline of a square surrounds the screen. Inside the bottom half of the square, El Chombo's name is written in cursive, and below that, "Dame Tu Cosita"
"Dame Tu Cosita" ([ˈda.me tu ko.ˈsi.ta], lit. "Give me your little thing"[1] or "give me your thingy"[2]) is a song by Panamanian artist El Chombo, featuring Jamaican dancehall musician Cutty Ranks. It was originally recorded in 1997, but extended and released as a single in 2018. A remix with Pitbull and Karol G was released on August 29, 2018. History The song was first released on El Chombo's album Cuentos de la Cripta II (1998) where a short version of the song was under the name "Introduccion B (El Cosita Remix)". A remix of the song was released in 2002 on the album Cuentos de la Cripta Remixes.[3] Following the song's viral Internet popularity, French record label Juston Records signed El Chombo and commissioned an extended version of the track. The label also acquired the rights to ArtNoux's video and requested a new video for the extended track.[3] Ultra Music acquired the worldwide distribution rights to the new, extended song and music video. In April 2018, the music video was uploaded to Ultra's YouTube channel, and its popularity skyrocketed.[2] The track was released as a single soon after, which debuted at No. 81 on the Billboard Hot 100.[4] A remix featuring Pitbull and Karol G was released on August 29, 2018, and was produced by El Chombo and Afro Bros.[5] Music video The video shows an extended animation of the alien video to the full remix of "Dame Tu Cosita" animated by ArtNoux and directed by Sihem OUILLANI. The video was the seventh most-viewed music video on YouTube worldwide in 2018.[6] As of August 2019, the YouTube video has received over 1.4 billion views.[7] The music video of the Remix with Pitbull and Karol G, is also directed by Sihem OUILLANI and the shooting was in Miami. The Text of this song is: Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Muévete para aquí, muévete para allå Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, pure energy) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Muévete para aquí, muévete para allå Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, pure energy) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Dame tu cosita ah, ay Dame tu cosita ah ah Muévete para aquí, muévete para allå Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, pure energy) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, cosita, cosita) Dame tu cosita (ay toma, cosita, eh)

Pacman run away from TREX!


                                             


Who is Trex?
Tyrannosaurusis a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), often called T. rex or colloquially T-Rex, is one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Tyrannosaurus lived throughout what is now western North America, on what was then an island continent known as Laramidia. Tyrannosaurus had a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 68 to 66 million years ago. It was the last known member of the tyrannosaurids, and among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to its large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were short but unusually powerful for their size and had two clawed digits. The most complete specimen measures up to 12.3 m (40 ft) in length though T. rex could grow to lengths of over 12.3 m (40 ft), up to 3.66 meters (12 ft) tall at the hips, and according to most modern estimates 8.4 metric tons (9.3 short tons) to 14 metric tons (15.4 short tons) in weight. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size, it is still among the largest known land predators and is estimated to have exerted the largest bite force among all terrestrial animals. By far the largest carnivore in its environment, Tyrannosaurus rex was most likely an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs, armored herbivores like ceratopsians and ankylosaurs, and possibly sauropods. Some experts have suggested the dinosaur was primarily a scavenger. The question of whether Tyrannosaurus was an apex predator or a pure scavenger was among the longest debates in paleontology. Most paleontologists today accept that Tyrannosaurus was both an active predator and a scavenger. More than 50 specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex have been identified, some of which are nearly complete skeletons. Soft tissue and proteins have been reported in at least one of these specimens. The abundance of fossil material has allowed significant research into many aspects of its biology, including its life history and biomechanics. The feeding habits, physiology and potential speed of Tyrannosaurus rex are a few subjects of debate. Its taxonomy is also controversial, as some scientists consider Tarbosaurus bataar from Asia to be a second Tyrannosaurus species while others maintain Tarbosaurus is a separate genus. Several other genera of North American tyrannosaurids have also been synonymized with Tyrannosaurus. Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest land carnivores of all time. One of the largest and the most complete specimen, nicknamed Sue (FMNH PR2081), is located at the Field Museum of Natural History. Sue measured 12.8 meters (42 ft) long, was 3.66 meters (12 ft) tall at the hips, and according to the most recent studies, using a variety of techniques, estimated to have weighed between 8.4 metric tons (9.3 short tons) to 14 metric tons (15.4 short tons). A specimen nicknamed Scotty (RSM P2523.8), located at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, is reported to measure 13 m (43 ft) in length. Using a mass estimation technique that extrapolates from the circumference of the femur, Scotty was estimated as the largest known specimen at 8.8 metric tons (9.7 short tons) in weight. Not every adult Tyrannosaurus specimen recovered is as big. Historically average adult mass estimates have varied widely over the years, from as low as 4.5 metric tons (5.0 short tons), to more than 7.2 metric tons (7.9 short tons), with most modern estimates ranging between 5.4 metric tons (6.0 short tons) and 8.0 metric tons (8.8 short tons). The largest known Tyrannosaurus rex skull measures up to 1.52 meters (5 ft) in length. Large fenestrae (openings) in the skull reduced weight, as in all carnivorous theropods. In other respects Tyrannosaurus's skull was significantly different from those of large non-tyrannosaurid theropods. It was extremely wide at the rear but had a narrow snout, allowing unusually good binocular vision.[15][16] The skull bones were massive and the nasals and some other bones were fused, preventing movement between them; but many were pneumatized (contained a "honeycomb" of tiny air spaces) and thus lighter. These and other skull-strengthening features are part of the tyrannosaurid trend towards an increasingly powerful bite, which easily surpassed that of all non-tyrannosaurids. The tip of the upper jaw was U-shaped (most non-tyrannosauroid carnivores had V-shaped upper jaws), which increased the amount of tissue and bone a tyrannosaur could rip out with one bite, although it also increased the stresses on the front teeth. Profile view of a skull (AMNH 5027) The teeth of Tyrannosaurus rex displayed marked heterodonty (differences in shape). The premaxillary teeth, four per side at the front of the upper jaw, were closely packed, D-shaped in cross-section, had reinforcing ridges on the rear surface, were incisiform (their tips were chisel-like blades) and curved backwards. The D-shaped cross-section, reinforcing ridges and backwards curve reduced the risk that the teeth would snap when Tyrannosaurus bit and pulled. The remaining teeth were robust, like "lethal bananas" rather than daggers, more widely spaced and also had reinforcing ridges.Those in the upper jaw, twelve per side in mature individuals, were larger than their counterparts of the lower jaw, except at the rear. The largest found so far is estimated to have been 30.5 centimeters (12 in) long including the root when the animal was alive, making it the largest tooth of any carnivorous dinosaur yet found. The lower jaw was robust. Its front dentary bone bore thirteen teeth. Behind the tooth row, the lower jaw became notably taller. The vertebral column of Tyrannosaurus consisted of ten neck vertebrae, thirteen back vertebrae and five sacral vertebrae. The number of tail vertebrae is unknown and could well have varied between individuals but probably numbered at least forty. Sue was mounted with forty-seven of such caudal vertebrae.The neck of Tyrannosaurus rex formed a natural S-shaped curve like that of other theropods. Compared to these, it was exceptionally short, deep and muscular to support the massive head. The second vertebra, the axis, was especially short. The remaining neck vertebrae were weakly opisthocoelous, i.e. with a convex front of the vertebral body and a concave rear. The vertebral bodies had single pleurocoels, pneumatic depressions created by air sacs, on their sides. The vertebral bodies of the torso were robust but with a narrow waist. Their undersides were keeled. The front sides were concave with a deep vertical trough. They had large pleurocoels. Their neural spines had very rough front and rear sides for the attachment of strong tendons. The sacral vertebrae were fused to each other, both in their vertebral bodies and neural spines. They were pneumatized. They were connected to the pelvis by transverse processes and sacral ribs. The tail was heavy and moderately long, in order to balance the massive head and torso and to provide space for massive locomotor muscles that attached to the thighbones. The thirteenth tail vertebra formed the transition point between the deep tail base and the middle tail that was stiffened by rather long front articulation processes. The underside of the trunk was covered by eighteen or nineteen pairs of segmented belly ribs. Right forelimb of Tyrannosaurus The shoulder girdle was longer than the entire forelimb. The shoulder blade had a narrow shaft but was exceptionally expanded at its upper end. It connected via a long forward protrusion to the coracoid, which was rounded. Both shoulder blades were connected by a small furcula. The paired breast bones possibly were made of cartilage only. The forelimb or arm was very short. The upper arm bone, the humerus, was short but robust. It had a narrow upper end with an exceptionally rounded head. The lower arm bones, the ulna and radius, were straight elements, much shorter than the humerus. The second metacarpal was longer and wider than the first, whereas normally in theropods the opposite is true. The forelimbs had only two clawed fingers, along with an additional splint-like small third metacarpal representing the remnant of a third digit. The pelvis was a large structure. Its upper bone, the ilium, was both very long and high, providing an extensive attachment area for hindlimb muscles. The front pubic bone ended in an enormous pubic boot, longer than the entire shaft of the element. The rear ischium was slender and straight, pointing obliquely to behind and below. In contrast to the arms, the hindlimbs were among the longest in proportion to body size of any theropod. In the foot, the metatarsus was "arctometatarsalian", meaning that the part of the third metatarsal near the ankle was pinched. The third metatarsal was also exceptionally sinuous. Compensating for the immense bulk of the animal, many bones throughout the skeleton were hollowed, reducing its weight without significant loss of strength.

Humpty Dumpty Song!





Humpty Dumpty is a character in an English nursery rhyme, probably originally a riddle and one of the best known in the English-speaking world. He is typically portrayed as a personified egg, though he is not explicitly described as such. The first recorded versions of the rhyme date from late eighteenth-century England and the tune from 1870 in James William Elliott's National Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs.[1] Its origins are obscure and several theories have been advanced to suggest original meanings. The character of Humpty Dumpty was popularised in the United States by actor George L. Fox (1825–77). As a character and literary allusion, he has appeared or been referred to in a large number of works of literature and popular culture, particularly English author Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass (1872), in which he was described as an egg. The rhyme is listed in the Roud Folk Song Index as No. 13026. The rhyme is one of the best known in the English language. The common text from 1954 is: Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the king's horses and all the king's men Couldn't put Humpty together again. William Carey Richards (1818–1892) quoted the poem in 1843, commenting, "when we were five years old ... the following parallel lines... were propounded as a riddle ... Humpty-dumpty, reader, is the Dutch or something else for an egg".[8] A manuscript addition to a copy of Mother Goose's Melody published in 1803 has the modern version with a different last line: "Could not set Humpty Dumpty up again".[7] It was published in 1810 in a version of Gammer Gurton's Garland as: Humpty Dumpty sate [sic] on a wall, Humpti Dumpti [sic] had a great fall; Threescore men and threescore more, Cannot place Humpty dumpty as he was before.[9] In 1842, James Orchard Halliwell published a collected version as: Humpty Dumpty lay in a beck. With all his sinews around his neck; Forty Doctors and forty wrights Couldn't put Humpty Dumpty to rights![10] The modern-day version of this nursery rhyme, as known throughout the UK since at least the mid-twentieth century, is as follows: Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall; All the King's horses And all the King's men, Couldn't put Humpty together again.

Meaning


Humpty Dumpty, shown as a riddle with answer, in a 1902 Mother Goose story book by William Wallace Denslow
The rhyme does not explicitly state that the subject is an egg, possibly because it may have been originally posed as a riddle.[7] There are also various theories of an original "Humpty Dumpty". One, advanced by Katherine Elwes Thomas in 1930[13] and adopted by Robert Ripley,[7] posits that Humpty Dumpty is King Richard III of England, depicted as humpbacked in Tudor histories and particularly in Shakespeare's play, and who was defeated, despite his armies, at Bosworth Field in 1485.
Punch in 1842 suggested jocularly that the rhyme was a metaphor for the downfall of Cardinal Wolsey; just as Wolsey was not buried in his intended tomb, so Humpty Dumpty was not buried in his shell.[14]
Professor David Daube suggested in The Oxford Magazine of 16 February 1956 that Humpty Dumpty was a "tortoise" siege engine, an armoured frame, used unsuccessfully to approach the walls of the Parliamentary held city of Gloucester in 1643 during the Siege of Gloucester in the English Civil War. This was on the basis of a contemporary account of the attack, but without evidence that the rhyme was connected.[15] The theory was part of an anonymous series of articles on the origin of nursery rhymes and was widely acclaimed in academia,[16] but it was derided by others as "ingenuity for ingenuity's sake" and declared to be a spoof.[17][18] The link was nevertheless popularised by a children's opera All the King's Men by Richard Rodney Bennett, first performed in 1969.[
From 1996, the website of the Colchester tourist board attributed the origin of the rhyme to a cannon recorded as used from the church of St Mary-at-the-Wall by the Royalist defenders in the siege of 1648.[21] In 1648, Colchester was a walled town with a castle and several churches and was protected by the city wall. The story given was that a large cannon, which the website claimed was colloquially called Humpty Dumpty, was strategically placed on the wall. A shot from a Parliamentary cannon succeeded in damaging the wall beneath Humpty Dumpty, which caused the cannon to tumble to the ground. The Royalists (or Cavaliers, "all the King's men") attempted to raise Humpty Dumpty on to another part of the wall, but the cannon was so heavy that "All the King's horses and all the King's men couldn't put Humpty together again". Author Albert Jack claimed in his 2008 book Pop Goes the Weasel: The Secret Meanings of Nursery Rhymes that there were two other verses supporting this claim. Elsewhere, he claimed to have found them in an "old dusty library, [in] an even older book", but did not state what the book was or where it was found. It has been pointed out that the two additional verses are not in the style of the seventeenth century or of the existing rhyme, and that they do not fit with the earliest printed versions of the rhyme, which do not mention horses and men.

In popular culture


A poster advertising a pantomime version at the Olympic Theatre in New York 1868, starring George L. Fox
Humpty Dumpty has become a highly popular nursery rhyme character. American actor George L. Fox (1825–77) helped to popularise the character in nineteenth-century stage productions of pantomime versions, music, and rhyme.[29] The character is also a common literary allusion, particularly to refer to a person in an insecure position, something that would be difficult to reconstruct once broken, or a short and fat person. Humpty Dumpty has been used in a large range of literary works in addition to his appearance as a character in Through the Looking-Glass, including L. Frank Baum's Mother Goose in Prose (1901), where the rhyming riddle is devised by the daughter of the king, having witnessed Humpty's "death" and her father's soldiers' efforts to save him.[31] In Neil Gaiman's early short story The Case of the Four and Twenty Blackbirds, the Humpty Dumpty story is turned into a film noir-style hardboiled crime story, involving other characters from popular nursery rhymesRobert Rankin used Humpty Dumpty as one victim of a serial fairy-tale character murderer in The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (2002). Jasper Fforde included Humpty Dumpty in his novels The Well of Lost Plots(2003)] and The Big Over Easy (2005),[35] which use him respectively as a ringleader of dissatisfied nursery rhyme characters threatening to strike and as the victim of a murder. Humpty Dumpty appears as a lead villain in the DreamWorks animation Puss in Boots (2011).
The rhyme has also been used as a reference in more serious literary works, including as a recurring motif of the Fall of Man in James Joyce's 1939 novel Finnegans Wake.[36]Robert Penn Warren's 1946 American novel All the King's Men is the story of populist politician Willie Stark's rise to the position of governor and eventual fall, based on the career of the infamous Louisiana Senator and Governor Huey Long. It won the 1947 Pulitzer Prize and was twice made into a film in 1949 and 2006, the former winning the Academy Award for best motion picture.[37] This was echoed in Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward's book All the President's Men, about the Watergate scandal, referring to the failure of the President's staff to repair the damage once the scandal had leaked out. It was filmed as All the President's Men in 1976, starring Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman.[38] Similarly, Humpty Dumpty is referred to in Paul Auster's 1985 novel City of Glass, when two characters discuss him as "the purest embodiment of the human condition" and quote extensively from Through the Looking Glass.[39] Luis d'Antin van Rooten's 1967 book Mots d'Heures, a collection of homophonically translated poetry, includes a version of the rhyme in nonsensical French text, beginning "Un petit d'un petit, S'Ă©tonne aux Halles...".
It has also been used as a common motif in popular music, including Hank Thompson's "Humpty Dumpty Heart" (1948), The Monkees' "All the King's Horses" (1966), Aretha Franklin's "All the King's Horses" (1972), Tori Amos's "Humpty Dumpty" (1992),[41] and Travis's "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" (2001).[42] In jazzOrnette Coleman and Chick Corea wrote different compositions, both titled Humpty Dumpty. (In Corea's case, however, it is a part of a concept album inspired by Lewis Carroll called The Mad Hatter, 1978).
In the Dolly Parton song Starting Over Again, it's all the king's horses and all the king's men who can't put the divorced couple back together again. The 1925 song "I'm Sitting on Top of the World" twice mentions Humpty in its lyrics with the line "just like Humpty Dumpty, I'm gonna fall". Similarly, in an extra verse in one version of ABBA's On and On and On, Humpty Dumpty is mentioned as being afraid of falling.

Mickey Mouse Surprise Eggs!




When is Born Mickey Mouse?
Mickey Mouse is a funny animal cartoon character and the mascot of The Walt Disney Company. He was created by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks at the Walt Disney Studios in 1928. An anthropomorphic mouse who typically wears red shorts, large yellow shoes, and white gloves, Mickey is one of the world's most recognizable characters. Created as a replacement for a prior Disney character, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, Mickey first appeared in the short Plane Crazy, debuting publicly in the short film Steamboat Willie (1928), one of the first sound cartoons. He went on to appear in over 130 films, including The Band Concert (1935), Brave Little Tailor (1938), and Fantasia (1940). Mickey appeared primarily in short films, but also occasionally in feature-length films. Ten of Mickey's cartoons were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, one of which, Lend a Paw, won the award in 1942. In 1978, Mickey became the first cartoon character to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Beginning in 1930, Mickey has also been featured extensively as a comic strip character. His self-titled newspaper strip, drawn primarily by Floyd Gottfredson, ran for 45 years. Mickey has also appeared in comic books such as Disney Italy's Topolino, MM - Mickey Mouse Mystery Magazine, and Wizards of Mickey, and in television series such as The Mickey Mouse Club (1955–1996) and others. He also appears in other media such as video games as well as merchandising and is a meetable character at the Disney parks. Mickey generally appears alongside his girlfriend Minnie Mouse, his pet dog Pluto, his friends Donald Duck and Goofy, and his nemesis Pete, among others (see Mickey Mouse universe). Though originally characterized as a cheeky lovable rogue, Mickey was rebranded over time as a nice guy, usually seen as an honest and bodacious hero. In 2009, Disney began to rebrand the character again by putting less emphasis on his friendly, well-meaning persona and reintroducing the more menacing and stubborn sides of his personality, beginning with the video game Epic Mickey.[3] In August 2018, ABC television announced a two-hour prime time special, Mickey's 90th spectacular, in honor of Mickey's 90th birthday.[4] On November 18, 2018 "Mickey Mouse 90th Anniversary" was celebrated around the World.

Production by country

United States and United Kingdom

Comic strips

The first Disney comics appeared in daily newspapers, syndicated by King Features with production done in-house by a Disney comic strip department at the studio. The Mickey Mouse daily comic strip began on January 13, 1930,[1] featuring Mickey as an optimistic, adventure-seeking young mouse. It was initially written by Walt Disney (who early in his career had aspirations to be a comic strip creator, attempting without success to sell a strip titled Mr. George's Wife[2]) with art by Ub Iwerks and Win Smith. Beginning with the May 5, 1930 installment the art chores were taken up by Floyd Gottfredson (often aided by various inkers), who also either wrote or supervised the story continuities (relying on various writers to flesh out his plots). Gottfredson continued with the strip until 1975. A Sunday strip started January 10, 1932 with a topper Silly Symphony strip.[3]
Silly Symphony initially related the adventures of Bucky Bug, the first Disney character to originate in the comics.[4] It subsequently printed adaptations of some of the Symphony cartoons, several extended periods of stories involving Pluto and Little Hiawatha along with adaptations of Snow White and Pinocchio. By late 1935 the strip was a standalone half-page, not strictly a topper for the Mickey Sunday.
The Silly Symphony strip included the following stories: [5]
  • Bucky Bug (Jan 10, 1932 - March 4, 1934)
  • Birds of a Feather (March 11 - June 17, 1934)
  • Peculiar Penguins (July 1 - Sept 9, 1934)
  • The Little Red Hen (Sept 16 - Dec 16, 1934)
  • The Boarding School Mystery (Dec 23, 1934 - Feb 17, 1935)
  • Ambrose the Robber Kitten (Feb 24 - April 21, 1935)
  • Cookieland (April 28 - July 21, 1935)
  • Three Little Kittens (July 28 - Oct 20, 1935)
  • The Life and Adventures of Elmer the Elephant (Oct 27, 1935 - Jan 12, 1936)
  • Further Adventures of the Three Little Pigs (Jan 19 - Aug 23, 1936)
  • Donald Duck (Aug 30, 1936 - Dec 5, 1937)
  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (Dec 12, 1937 - April 24, 1938)
  • Practical Pig (May 1 - Aug 7, 1938)
  • Mother Pluto (Aug 14 - Oct 16, 1938)
  • Farmyard Symphony (Oct 23 - Nov 27, 1938)
  • Timid Elmer (Dec 4, 1938 - Feb 12, 1939)
  • Pluto the Pup (Feb 19 - March 19, 1939)
  • The Ugly Duckling (March 26 - April 16, 1939)
  • Pluto the Pup (April 23 - Dec 17, 1939)
  • Pinocchio (Dec 24, 1939 - April 7, 1940)
  • Pluto the Pup (April 14 - Nov 3, 1940)
  • Little Hiawatha (Nov 10, 1940 - July 12, 1942)
Donald Duck made his first comics appearance in the Silly Symphony adaptation of the 1934 Disney short The Wise Little Hen (Sept. 16, 1934-Dec. 16, 1934). As Donald's popularity grew, he became the star of the Silly Symphony strip for an extended run (August 1936 to December 1937),[6] and then got his own daily strip starting on February 7, 1938. A Donald Sunday strip premiered December 10, 1939. Carl Barks, known to fans as "The Duck Man," wrote at least 20 of the strips between 1938 and 1940.[7] Donald Duck ran until May 2005, when it went into reprints.[7]
An oddity is in the 1930s a Disney strip was done seemingly outside the purview of the Strip Dept. for a national audience. It was created by Fred Spencer, an animator at the studio. Entitled "Mickey Mouse Chapter", it appeared in the International DeMolay Cordon the monthly newsletter of Demolay beginning with its Dec. 1932 issue through May 1933 (except March 1933). This was a two tier black and white strip depicting happenings in the Demolay Chapter formed by Mickey and his barnyard friends. Spencer and Walt Disney were both members of Demolay. While the last installment promised the series would return in the Sept. 1933 issue without explanation it did not. The extant installments have been reprinted as part of the first volume of Sunday Mickey Mouse comic strips by Floyd Gottfredson published in 2013 by Fantagraphics.[8]
The Silly Symphony Sunday-only strip ended July 12, 1942.[9] This was replaced with an adaptation of Bambi, and then a JosĂ© Carioca Sunday only strip and a Panchito strip, until it in turn was replaced by Uncle Remus and His Tales of Br'er Rabbit. The Uncle Remus strip began, like the others, as a topper for the Mickey Mouse strip, but after the first few years, almost always appeared on its own. The strip lasted until th end of 1972.[10]
  • Bambi (July 19 - Oct 4, 1942)
  • JosĂ© Carioca (Oct 11, 1942 - Oct 1, 1944)
  • Panchito (Oct 8, 1944 - Oct 7, 1945)
  • Uncle Remus and His Tales of Br'er Rabbit (Oct 14, 1945 - Dec 31, 1972)
Initially Floyd Gottfredson along with his responsibilities for the Mickey comic strip oversaw the Disney comic strip department from 1930 to 1945, then Frank Reilly was brought in to administer the burgeoning department from January 1946 to 1975. Greg Crosby headed the department from 1979 to 1989.
Besides the strips described above the other Disney strips distributed over the years included (chronologically by start date):
For the first eight months Scamp had continuity and was written by Ward Greene, the King Features editor whose short story and novelization contributed to the development of the storyline for Lady and the Tramp. Advance publicity for the strip noted Greene's participation[18] and the strip carried the byline "By Ward Greene". Disney historian Jim Fanning notes Scamp likely is "the only strip written by the original author of the work from which it sprang".[19]
Sunday strips adapting Cinderella[20] and Alice in Wonderland[21] were distributed as stand-alone specials in 1950 and 1951 respectively. The following year the Sunday adaptations of Disney films began being issued under the title Treasury of Classic Tales as part of an ongoing strip.[22]
Beginning in 1960[23] a special daily strip with a holiday theme utilizing the Disney characters was offered each year through 1987.[24][25][26] It generally ran for three weeks with the concluding strip appearing on December 25, often promoting the latest Disney release or re-release.[27] These were unique in that they in some cases showcased the crossover of Disney characters that otherwise rarely interacted (e.g. the Big Bad Wolf and the fairies from Sleeping Beauty). The tradition was revived in the mid-1990s to publicize contemporary Disney feature animated films: Beauty and the Beast (1992), Aladdin (1993), The Lion King (1994), Pocahontas (1995), Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996) and The Little Mermaid (for its re-release, 1997).[28] Newspaper Enterprise Association offered a similar holiday themed special stripfrom 1936 to 2010.[29][30]
The following writers and artists worked on the Disney comic strips:
  • Donald Duck: written by Bob Karp; art by Al Taliaferro, Frank Grundeen, Al Hubbard, Kay Wright, Ellis Eringer, Daan JippesTony Strobl, Larry Mayer, Jim Franzen, Ulrich Schroder, Jorgen Klubien, Bill Langley, Pete Alvarado, Frank Smith and Larry Knighton.
  • Gummi Bears: art by Rick Hoover.
  • Jose Carioca: art by Paul Murry.
  • Merry Menagerie: written by Bob Karp; art by Bob Grant.
  • Mickey Mouse: written by Floyd GottfredsonMerrill De MarisTed OsborneBill Walsh and Floyd Norman; art by Floyd Gottfredson, Roman Arambula, Rick Hoover, Alex Howell, Manuel Gonzales, Bill Wright, Ted Thwaites, Carson Van OstenDaan Jippes, Larry Mayer and Jim Engel.
  • Mickey Mouse and His Friends: written by Milt Banta and Roy Williams; art by Ken Hultgren and Julius Svendsen.
  • Scamp: art by John Ushler and Larry Mayer.
  • Treasury of Classic Tales: written by Carl Fallberg and Frank Reilly; art by Floyd Gottfredson, John Ushler, Julius Svendsen and Jesse Marsh.
  • True Life Adventures: written by Dick Huemer, art by George Wheeler.
  • Uncle Remus: written by Bill Walsh, George Stallings and Jack Boyd; art by Bill Wright, Riley Thomson, Chuck Fuson, John Ushler, Dick Moores, Paul Murry
  • Winnie the Pooh: written by Don Ferguson; art by Larry Mayer and Richard Moore.
Norman, in an article, listed the writers working in the comic strip department in the 1980s and mentions Cal Howard, Del Connell, Bill Berg (Donald DuckScamps),[31] Don Ferguson, Tom Yakutis and Bob Foster and notes that their boss, Greg Crosby, had gotten his start as a writer for the strips before moving into management.[32]
The Disney comic strip department closed in January 1990. The last two strips, Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, continued to be supervised by King Features. The Donald strip was drawn by Larry Knighton with King Features staffers writing it.[33] The Donald strip was discontinued in the mid-1990s. In this period the Mickey strip had Floyd Norman as the writer and art rotating between Rick Hoover and Alex Howell. Norman convinced the syndicate to allow him to drop the gag-a-day format in favor of adventure continuities of up to four weeks, much in the style of the classic Gottfredson era. By 1994 the strip was running in only 30 newspapers and by mutual agreement of Disney and King Features it ended.[32] Both strips continued with reprints.
Currently reprints of Merrie Menagerie are a regular feature of Disney Newsreel, a bi-weekly magazine for Disney employees in Southern California. Disney's fan-oriented website D23 daily posts an installment of the Scamp strip with links to an extensive archives of past installments (which includes the Mickey and Donald strip). Among the regular features of the quarterly Disney Twenty-Three magazine for D23 members is "The Funny Pages", a section reprinting classic Disney comics strips.[34]
In recent years Creators Syndicate has offered reprints of the Donald DuckMickey Mouse and Winnie the Pooh strips as part of a "classics" package and posts the current strip on its site (without archiving).[35]Domestically the strips have 20-30 clients at any one time; they also appear in many newspapers outside the United States (exact number unknown).